At first sight, you can easily recognize a Japanese woman from any other asian girl. Not only by her face and body features but also by her unique sens of styling. From a foreigners eyes, sometimes, Japanese woman have habits that we could not get if nobody explains us the reason behind it. Here are five things that Japanese woman do and should be explained.

1. Oversized shoes

Who would ever purchase shoes 3 sizes bigger than your actual size? There are few reasons for this strange phenomenon.
• First, Japan shoes size system can be very restrictive: S, M, L, LL. So if you are between two sizes, it can be tricky.
• Second, shopaholic as they are, impulsive purchase are quite frequent. Typical dilemma: “What? Wait one week for my size to arrive? No way!“; “What? Sales on my favorite designer shoes and my size is no longer available? I’ll buy anyway!” Moreover, the shop staff is always trying to convince you that size don’t matter.
• Third and main reason: Japanese don’t mind at all losing their shoes while there walking and it is even easier for them to have oversized shoes as they have to take them on and off many times a day. When they are in the street, most of the Japanese walk as if they are wearing slippers or geta (traditional sandal) and never lift the foot. So having shoes that doesn’t fit is not a problem at all.

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2. Mini bags multiplication

This has been a question I asked myself many times: “What’s the point of having three small bags when you can have a big one?” Japanese women have a tiny handbag, plus a tote bag, plus an umbrella , plus maybe a bento bag or a computer bag. The answer is simple: apparently, it is a sign of femininity and elegance to carry tiny bags. Also every bag has a use to find want you want easily. Besides, security is not a problem in Japan, so women don’t worry about having to keep their tiny designer bag close to them.

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3. Socks mania

Footwear is an institution in a country like Japan where socks are a part of the traditional wear too. Tabi ( japanese traditional socks) are worn to be showed. So in Japanese culture, socks are not so much an underwear but more like a piece of cloth. That’s probably why women wearing high socks and mini skirt are not considered as provocative in Japan. Socks are covering your body and is a part of a fashion concept. Many specialized shops exist in Japan and the variety of models is amazing. The game is to find a pair of socks that perfectly matches your coordination of the day.

 

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4. Blushing eyes

This trend has developed two years ago in Harajuku and slowly took over the kawaii world. The trick is to put a vivid pink blush on a straight line under the eye. It looks very weird at first sight but it gives girls the sick/cute/weak image that Japanese crazes for. The trend will probably fade away one day, but for now, it’s an interesting technique to try.

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5. Surgical mask

Basically, in a big city like Tokyo, almost everybody is wearing surgical mask in public transportation. To Occidental, this might be a frightening image that made you think the whole population knows about something dangerous you don’t. Don’t worry, this phenomenon is mainly a sanitary precaution. Japanese are very serious about keeping their germs for them, so if you have a cold, society will expect you to wear a mask in order to avoid spreading germs. You also want to hide your red runny nose and your fetid breath to others, because you are in Japan and you still have to go to work.

Actually, mask are also a fashion accessory to young people. More than everything, young people tends to use mask to hide themselves. Perfect solution for girls who are on a lazy day and pass on makeup or have a bad skin day. The phenomenon is so big that a makeup artist named Zawachin made a book just about how to look like celebrities with your eye makeup only. In our days, you wear a mask to hide from the world and social interaction: you dont have to smile, you don’t have to assume your pimple.

Nevertheless, if you are sick in Japan, try to wear a mask in public, it’s simply a polite thing to do.

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